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The Great War

The Great War, The War to End All Wars, and then finally World War One was arguably one of the most influential wars fought in the last century. With such a tremendous loss of life as well as a huge impact on modern warfare it's a wonder we don't study it more. Let's not sit and let this war be forgotten and skipped over. There is so much this time period has to offer and I want everyone to get excited about learning something about this war. If you're curious at all about anything please ask.
Sep 10 '14
greatwar-1914:

September 2nd, 1914 - French Government Evacuates Paris
Pictured - A map showing the Parisian forts.
The French had not yet realized that von Kluck’s army had turned away from Paris.  On the 2nd, the anniversary of the Sedan, the downhearted government chose to evacuate.  The Parisians mocked their fleeing government, but many of them wished to escape as well.  Military Governor of Paris Gallieni was happy enough to have the government gone, as he now wielded sole power over the defence of the city.
On that day Gallieni finally received the forces that he had been nagging Joffre to give him, gaining six divisions.  The next morning posters appeared all over the city, proclaiming Gallieni’s determination to defend the city to the last.
The German soldiers who threatened Paris felt less than triumphant, however.  One officer wrote of their condition: “Our men are done up, they stagger forward, their faces coated with dust, their uniforms in rags.  They look like starving scarecrows.”
The men relied on alcohol and the thought of Paris to keep them going.  On the 2nd Moltke confirmed von Kluck’s decision to go south-east of the city and try and roll up the French line.  He ordered von Kluck’s army to provide flank support to the German 2nd Army under von Bülow, but Kluck the pacemaker was outraged at this decision. 
Kluck kept racing forward, neglecting to defend the German flanks.  He thought it sufficient to keep one weak corps facing Paris while the rest of the army marched on.  The German flank was now presented to the city of Paris and Gallieni’s new army.

greatwar-1914:

September 2nd, 1914 - French Government Evacuates Paris

Pictured - A map showing the Parisian forts.

The French had not yet realized that von Kluck’s army had turned away from Paris.  On the 2nd, the anniversary of the Sedan, the downhearted government chose to evacuate.  The Parisians mocked their fleeing government, but many of them wished to escape as well.  Military Governor of Paris Gallieni was happy enough to have the government gone, as he now wielded sole power over the defence of the city.

On that day Gallieni finally received the forces that he had been nagging Joffre to give him, gaining six divisions.  The next morning posters appeared all over the city, proclaiming Gallieni’s determination to defend the city to the last.

The German soldiers who threatened Paris felt less than triumphant, however.  One officer wrote of their condition: “Our men are done up, they stagger forward, their faces coated with dust, their uniforms in rags.  They look like starving scarecrows.”

The men relied on alcohol and the thought of Paris to keep them going.  On the 2nd Moltke confirmed von Kluck’s decision to go south-east of the city and try and roll up the French line.  He ordered von Kluck’s army to provide flank support to the German 2nd Army under von Bülow, but Kluck the pacemaker was outraged at this decision. 

Kluck kept racing forward, neglecting to defend the German flanks.  He thought it sufficient to keep one weak corps facing Paris while the rest of the army marched on.  The German flank was now presented to the city of Paris and Gallieni’s new army.

Sep 10 '14
scrapironflotilla:

Standing in a trench, an unidentified Australian soldier models the type of gas mask used in the trenches, called a Small Box Respirator.

scrapironflotilla:

Standing in a trench, an unidentified Australian soldier models the type of gas mask used in the trenches, called a Small Box Respirator.

Sep 9 '14
scrapironflotilla:

A Frenchwoman serves coffee to six unidentified Australian and Scottish soldiers at an estaminet (small cafe) in her village, which is within 800 yards of the trenches in a comparatively quiet sector.
Australian soldiers received an extremely high rate of pay, compared to those of other Imperial nations. An Australian private in the AIF received 6 shillings per day, six times higher than a British private at the start of the War. This extra spending money allowed them to drink more alcohol while on leave, a partial reason behind their ill discipline. This came to a head in Egypt with ANZAC soldiers starting a riot in Cairo on 2nd April 1915.

scrapironflotilla:

A Frenchwoman serves coffee to six unidentified Australian and Scottish soldiers at an estaminet (small cafe) in her village, which is within 800 yards of the trenches in a comparatively quiet sector.

Australian soldiers received an extremely high rate of pay, compared to those of other Imperial nations. An Australian private in the AIF received 6 shillings per day, six times higher than a British private at the start of the War. This extra spending money allowed them to drink more alcohol while on leave, a partial reason behind their ill discipline. This came to a head in Egypt with ANZAC soldiers starting a riot in Cairo on 2nd April 1915.

Sep 9 '14
scrapironflotilla:

Corbie, France. 31 March 1918. Informal portrait of British cavalrymen cleaning up at Corbie after several days’ hard fighting. Note the initials XV HRS on the door on the left, most likely denoting billeting arrangements.

scrapironflotilla:

Corbie, France. 31 March 1918. Informal portrait of British cavalrymen cleaning up at Corbie after several days’ hard fighting. Note the initials XV HRS on the door on the left, most likely denoting billeting arrangements.

Sep 9 '14
scrapironflotilla:

An unidentified soldier stands beside a crater made by a German minenwerfer (trench mortar) bomb that fell just behind the front trench of the 11th Battalion near the Cordonnerie Farm during the bombardment that preceded a German raid. About 40 men were killed and 60 wounded in the bombardment of a short section of front line. 30 May 1916.

scrapironflotilla:

An unidentified soldier stands beside a crater made by a German minenwerfer (trench mortar) bomb that fell just behind the front trench of the 11th Battalion near the Cordonnerie Farm during the bombardment that preceded a German raid. About 40 men were killed and 60 wounded in the bombardment of a short section of front line. 30 May 1916.

Sep 9 '14
scrapironflotilla:

Shell fire and flares towards Pozieres. The pinpoints are bursts of shrapnel. The curved lines show the effect on the negative of Verey lights sent up by the Germans from front line trenches to illuminate an area where a raid is expected. Verey lights were flares used for signalling at night and lighting; they came in several colours and were fired from a pistol.
27 August 1916

scrapironflotilla:

Shell fire and flares towards Pozieres. The pinpoints are bursts of shrapnel. The curved lines show the effect on the negative of Verey lights sent up by the Germans from front line trenches to illuminate an area where a raid is expected. Verey lights were flares used for signalling at night and lighting; they came in several colours and were fired from a pistol.

27 August 1916

Sep 9 '14
ww1incolour:

ww1incolour:

Location: near Hirtzbach, France
Year: 1916
Description: A group of French soldiers posing in a trench near Hirtzbach, 1916.
Source: BuzzFeed

New Version Available.

ww1incolour:

ww1incolour:

Location: near Hirtzbach, France

Year: 1916

Description: A group of French soldiers posing in a trench near Hirtzbach, 1916.

Source: BuzzFeed

New Version Available.

Sep 9 '14
greatwarincolour:

British motorcycle dispatch riders taking cover from fire - October 1914Original image source: Library of Congress

greatwarincolour:

British motorcycle dispatch riders taking cover from fire - October 1914

Original image source: Library of Congress

Aug 30 '14
daemonrolling:

jasta11:

July the 28th, World War I starts (This newspaper was relesaed on August the 5th).

OTTOMAN EMPIRE ALMOST DECLARES WAR ON ITSELF

Basically World War I in a nutshell. 

daemonrolling:

jasta11:

July the 28th, World War I starts (This newspaper was relesaed on August the 5th).

OTTOMAN EMPIRE ALMOST DECLARES WAR ON ITSELF

Basically World War I in a nutshell. 

Aug 29 '14
invisiblestories:

"The recruits of 1914 have the look of ghosts. They are queuing up to be slaughtered: they are already dead." - Geoff Dyer, The Missing of the Somme
[Image: Austrian soldier at the wooden trenches during WWI, Eastern Europe, 1915, via deathandmysticism]

invisiblestories:

"The recruits of 1914 have the look of ghosts. They are queuing up to be slaughtered: they are already dead." - Geoff Dyer, The Missing of the Somme

[Image: Austrian soldier at the wooden trenches during WWI, Eastern Europe, 1915, via deathandmysticism]

Aug 29 '14

unsecolobreve:

25 August 1914: frontpages

Aug 29 '14
jasta11:

Gas attack on the West Front, near St. Quentin 1918 - Note the German messenger dog loosed by his handler. 

jasta11:

Gas attack on the West Front, near St. Quentin 1918 - Note the German messenger dog loosed by his handler. 

Aug 22 '14
imperialismus-taeglich:

Today, a hundred years ago…

imperialismus-taeglich:

Today, a hundred years ago…

Aug 21 '14
scrapironflotilla:

German prisoners, some of them wounded, and British infantrymen resting on the roadside in Bouzincourt, 26 March 1918.

scrapironflotilla:

German prisoners, some of them wounded, and British infantrymen resting on the roadside in Bouzincourt, 26 March 1918.

Aug 20 '14
scrapironflotilla:

12-inch gun (named “Bunty”) of the Royal Garrison Artillery after firing at Louez, 19 May 1918.

scrapironflotilla:

12-inch gun (named “Bunty”) of the Royal Garrison Artillery after firing at Louez, 19 May 1918.