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The Great War

The Great War, The War to End All Wars, and then finally World War One was arguably one of the most influential wars fought in the last century. With such a tremendous loss of life as well as a huge impact on modern warfare it's a wonder we don't study it more. Let's not sit and let this war be forgotten and skipped over. There is so much this time period has to offer and I want everyone to get excited about learning something about this war. If you're curious at all about anything please ask.
Sep 28 '14
whattheendoftheworldlookedlike:

Newmarket, England, 1910.

whattheendoftheworldlookedlike:

Newmarket, England, 1910.

Sep 28 '14
Sep 27 '14
whattheendoftheworldlookedlike:

c. World War One.

whattheendoftheworldlookedlike:

c. World War One.

Sep 27 '14
Sep 27 '14
whattheendoftheworldlookedlike:

Palestine, late 1910s.

whattheendoftheworldlookedlike:

Palestine, late 1910s.

Sep 27 '14
Sep 27 '14
Sep 26 '14
Sep 26 '14
Sep 26 '14
whattheendoftheworldlookedlike:

Bailleul, France, 1917.

whattheendoftheworldlookedlike:

Bailleul, France, 1917.

Sep 26 '14
whattheendoftheworldlookedlike:

France, World War One.

whattheendoftheworldlookedlike:

France, World War One.

Sep 26 '14
greatwar-1914:

September 9th, 1914 - German Right Wing Retreats
Pictured - The sudden, massive French counterattack caught the Germans off-guard.
By September 8th, von Moltke and the German High Command (OHL) were in panic.  No word had come from the First or Second Armies for two days, and aerial observers confirmed that a 50 km gap had opened between the two armies.  The BEF, finally back in action, was reported to be moving through this gap and around the German armies. 
Moltke called for a subordinate officer named Richard Hentsch to tour the German line, with power to sort out whatever problems he might find.  Whereas Joffre drove hundreds of miles, sometimes through enemy lines, to see his generals, Moltke refused to leave his command.  The German commander’s enthusiasm for war was swiftly waning.  
Hentsch found the German Fourth and Fifth armies on the left of the line in alright condition - engaged in furious fighting in the rugged Argonne terrain but confident of victory.  Von Hausen, commander of the Third Army, was equally confident, though perhaps falsely since a massive attack by his troops had just been repulsed.
On the German right, Hentsch found sheer chaos.  The armies of von Kluck and von Bülow, already exhausted by their long marches, were engaged in furious warfare. 
In one skirmish, typical of the ferocious days, a battalion of the German 74th Reserve Infantry Regiment was surrounded on all sides when it didn’t hear an order to fall back.   When the men realized their predicament and tried to surrender, the French mercilessly gunned them down, even as the Germans stood waving white handkerchiefs desperately.  93 men survived to be taken prisoner while 450 of their comrades lay dead at their feet.  This was only one instance in a battle that saw over half a million casualties.
With no reserves to bring to bear and seeing no solution, Hentsch contemplated withdrawal.  Before he could give the order, though, von Bülow of the Second Army jumped the gun. Bülow had despised Kluck and his hard-driving nature for some time now, he leapt at the opportunity to withdraw. 
Now, with no support, Kluck was forced to retreat.  There had been no major breaking point yet for von Bülow’s army - he could have stayed and fought, and then Kluck could have too.  If the Germans had held to their position, they could have beaten the French just in front of Paris.
Such are the what-if’s of history.  Kluck, his decision made for him, began his retreat.  Thus ended Kluck’s bloody thirty-day, 600 km advance on Paris.

greatwar-1914:

September 9th, 1914 - German Right Wing Retreats

Pictured - The sudden, massive French counterattack caught the Germans off-guard.

By September 8th, von Moltke and the German High Command (OHL) were in panic.  No word had come from the First or Second Armies for two days, and aerial observers confirmed that a 50 km gap had opened between the two armies.  The BEF, finally back in action, was reported to be moving through this gap and around the German armies.

Moltke called for a subordinate officer named Richard Hentsch to tour the German line, with power to sort out whatever problems he might find.  Whereas Joffre drove hundreds of miles, sometimes through enemy lines, to see his generals, Moltke refused to leave his command.  The German commander’s enthusiasm for war was swiftly waning. 

Hentsch found the German Fourth and Fifth armies on the left of the line in alright condition - engaged in furious fighting in the rugged Argonne terrain but confident of victory.  Von Hausen, commander of the Third Army, was equally confident, though perhaps falsely since a massive attack by his troops had just been repulsed.

On the German right, Hentsch found sheer chaos.  The armies of von Kluck and von Bülow, already exhausted by their long marches, were engaged in furious warfare. 

In one skirmish, typical of the ferocious days, a battalion of the German 74th Reserve Infantry Regiment was surrounded on all sides when it didn’t hear an order to fall back.   When the men realized their predicament and tried to surrender, the French mercilessly gunned them down, even as the Germans stood waving white handkerchiefs desperately.  93 men survived to be taken prisoner while 450 of their comrades lay dead at their feet.  This was only one instance in a battle that saw over half a million casualties.

With no reserves to bring to bear and seeing no solution, Hentsch contemplated withdrawal.  Before he could give the order, though, von Bülow of the Second Army jumped the gun. Bülow had despised Kluck and his hard-driving nature for some time now, he leapt at the opportunity to withdraw. 

Now, with no support, Kluck was forced to retreat.  There had been no major breaking point yet for von Bülow’s army - he could have stayed and fought, and then Kluck could have too.  If the Germans had held to their position, they could have beaten the French just in front of Paris.

Such are the what-if’s of history.  Kluck, his decision made for him, began his retreat.  Thus ended Kluck’s bloody thirty-day, 600 km advance on Paris.

Sep 25 '14
whattheendoftheworldlookedlike:

The Western Front, 1916.

whattheendoftheworldlookedlike:

The Western Front, 1916.

Sep 25 '14
greatwar-1914:

A French soldier takes a moment for a drink, August, 1914.

greatwar-1914:

A French soldier takes a moment for a drink, August, 1914.

Sep 25 '14
scrapironflotilla:

Australian troops in the Turkish Lone Pine trenches, captured on the afternoon of the 6 August 1915, by the AIF 1st Brigade under Brigadier-General Walker. The soldier at centre back is probably identified as  Private Joseph Clark, 7th Battalion, of South Yarra, Victoria. Clark, an 18 year old bootmaker enlisted on 22 April 1915 with his 21 year old brother Robert Clark. The brothers returned to Australia in May 1916 after being wounded. A third brother, Pte Percival Clark, also served at Gallipoli with the Wellington Infantry Battalion and survived the war. 

scrapironflotilla:

Australian troops in the Turkish Lone Pine trenches, captured on the afternoon of the 6 August 1915, by the AIF 1st Brigade under Brigadier-General Walker. The soldier at centre back is probably identified as  Private Joseph Clark, 7th Battalion, of South Yarra, Victoria. Clark, an 18 year old bootmaker enlisted on 22 April 1915 with his 21 year old brother Robert Clark. The brothers returned to Australia in May 1916 after being wounded. A third brother, Pte Percival Clark, also served at Gallipoli with the Wellington Infantry Battalion and survived the war.